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VaEtchanan

VaEtchanan

The Shape of the Tablets
 
In this week’s reading Moses proclaims to all Israel that “the Lord our G‑d made a covenant with us at Horeb,” and “face to face the Lord spoke…to your whole congregation at the mountain out of the fire…He inscribed them on two tablets of stone, which He gave to me” (Deut. 5:2-18). Three verses in the Torah note that this covenant was comprised of ten statements: “and he wrote down on the tablets the terms of the covenant, the Ten Commandments” (Ex. 34:28), and similarly also in Deuteronomy 4:13 and Deuteronomy 10:4. Full Article>>
 
 
Each Generation and Its Leader
By: Dr. Yair Barkai
 
Moses’ greatest longing in life was to enter the Promised Land along with the people he had led for decades, having taken them out of Egypt and wandered with them in the wilderness, suffering with them until the generation not privileged to enter the land had perished.  Now they were finally at the outskirts of the land he longed to enter, but the Lord would not heed his pleas to be permitted entry along with his people and answered him decidedly: Full Article>>
 
 
Moses’ Request to Enter the Land of Israel
By: Yehoshua Ivri
 
When the Israelites reached Kadesh in the Wilderness of Zin, in the month of Nisan in the fortieth year after the exodus from Egypt, only a few of those who had left Egypt, over age 60, remained alive, among them the three leaders—Moses, Aaron and Miriam.  In that year, on the 15th of Nisan, Miriam died and the people were left without water.  The people complained and the Lord instructed Moses and Aaron to take a staff and, before the entire community, to speak to the rock to get water out of it for all the people. Full Article>>
 
 
“Do what is right and good in the sight of the Lord” The Legal Norm or Kindness?
By: Rafi Vaaknin
 
Much has been written on the meaning of this verse, and mostly it has been interpreted as referring to acts of kindness, to being charitable.  Below, we shall examine this assumption and suggest another approach, viewing it as a binding legal norm. The well-known Talmudic story about Rabbah bar bar Hana and the porters is the most prominent, but not the only, midrashic source exploring the meaning of this rule.  Here we present the story as rendered by Rav Steinsaltz (Bava Metzia 83a): Full Article >>
 
 
Three Attestations
By: Yonah Bar-Maoz
 
In this week's reading Moses pleads for two things:  to the Lord, to be permitted to enter the land, and to the people, that they not forget what their eyes have seen.  Although Moses does not use the notion of le-hit-hanen (= to plead) when he addresses the people, nevertheless he repeats time and again the demand to remember the events of the past, so that the tone of his words is one of emotional beseeching.  This can be seen clearly from the text:  "But take utmost care [hishamer] and watch [shmor] yourselves scrupulously [me'od], so that you do not forget the things that you saw with your own eyes and so that they do not fade from your mind as long as you live.  And make them known to your children and to your children's children." Full Article >>
 
 
“You shall not make for yourself… any likeness” (Deut. 5:8)
By: Dr. Yosi Peretz
 
One of the characteristics of medieval manuscripts of the Bible which distinguishes them from printed editions is the illustrations that illuminate the text. [1]   Many of the manuscripts which have survived to our day contain magnificent pictures and illustrations, clearly attesting to the investment of great effort and money. [2]   These works of art were sometimes made by the scribe of the text himself, sometimes by a professional artist, and generally take one of the following three forms... Full Article >>
 
 
Last modified: 17/12/2019